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maryland house and garden pilgimage

CECIL COUNTY

SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010 - 10 am to 5 pm
Rain or Shine

 

Click here to download a PDF with Directions, Tour Information and other Details.

 

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1. PRINCIPIO MANSION HOUSE (also known as the Whitaker Mansion), 1723 PRINCIPIO FURNACE ROAD, PERRYVILLE

The Principio Iron Company, the first in Maryland, was formed in England in 1714 and began to purchase land in this area in 1721. Construction of a forge and furnace began in 1722 and by the 1750s the company had built two other furnaces in Baltimore County as well as one in Virginia. The existing mansion is a large two-and-a-half story, hipped roof frame house, built in the 1800s. It was the home of George P. Whitaker (1803-1890), the last ironmaster at the ironworks. The most impressive feature of the house is the expansive porch that wraps around the east and south facades. A frame carriage house with scalloped eave trim stands to the east of the house. The British destroyed the iron-making facilities during the War of 1812.

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2. LINTON HOUSE 316 MARKET STREET, CHARLESTOWN

Built by Town Commissioner William Linton when Charlestown served as the county seat, this fine house stands as a reminder of that prominent time in the town’s history. Samuel Hogg, a prosperous businessman from Wilmington, purchased the house in 1797 and it served as his residence until his death. George Washington recorded several stops here on his journeys along the Post Road from Philadelphia to Mount Vernon. The two story, five bay Flemish bond brick house is a restrained, late example of high-style Georgian architecture, complete with brick beltcourse and molded water table on the main façade. The door leads to a wide center hall flanked on each side by two rooms.

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3. INDIAN QUEEN TAVERN,
322 MARKET STREET, CHARLESTOWN

The Indian Queen is a two story frame structure 30 feet square with a floor plan consisting of four rooms arranged around a massive chimney, which rises through the middle of the first floor and accommodates four fireplaces set back to back. The cellar has no fireplace and was used for storage, although the bulk of it is filled by the huge stone foundation of the chimney, which is approximately 10 feet square. Throughout the interior, the moldings and trim are characteristic of the mid-18th century. The roof was rebuilt in the 19th century. The Indian Queen was restored in the 1960’s with funds available through the Maryland Historical Trust. Behind the tavern is a story and a half log kitchen with loft above. A two story smokehouse stands between the Indian Queen and neighboring Red Lyon Tavern. 

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4. RED LYON TAVERN / BLACK’S STORE
328 MARKET STREET, CHARLESTOWN

Located on lot 96 of the original plat of Charlestown, the building has a complex history. At its core is a room measuring 23 x 19 feet and constructed of poplar log planks, hewn square with the ends neatly fitted with intricate dovetailing. Some of the planks are twelve inches wide and five inches thick. The siding on the front is identical to the wide shiplap planks on the front of the later, larger structure, and the lower edges are beaded in the same way. Drylaid rubblestone walls underpin the log structure to form a cellar keeping room; the great cellar fireplace has an opening five feet wide. In about 1830 a one-room addition was built to the west of the log room. It also stands on a rubblestone foundation but exhibits post-and-beam construction. A second addition made to the rear of this structure contains a kitchen with a deep fireplace on the first floor.

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5. FAIR HILL NATURE CENTER, 630 TAWES DRIVE, ELKTON

William du Pont, Jr., a great, great grandson of Pierre Samuel du Pont, bought the first farm (1929) that would later become his Fair Hill estate. Italian stone masons built the hunting lodge (1945) which now houses the nature center. Mr. du Pont died in 1965 and his heirs sold the 5,700 acre Fair Hill property to the State of Maryland’s Department of Natural Resources. Fair Hill Nature Center opened in the former hunting lodge on Earth Day, April 16, 1990. The Foxcatcher Farm Covered Bridge, over Big Elk Creek, was constructed in 1860 at a cost of $1,165. In 1994, the bridge received the State’s Historic Civil Engineering Landmark Award. Also, on Fair Hill property is the Fair Hill Training Center. With a professional crew and on site veterinary services, they are well equipped to handle all equine needs. Pilgrims are welcome to watch the horses train on the tracks from the Clock Tower.

 

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6. SINKING SPRINGS HERB FARM,
843 ELK FOREST ROAD, ELKTON

There are 130 acres of gardens surrounding an 18th century provincial plantation house made of logs. The gardens feature a new Labyrinth Serenity Walk and an ancient sycamore tree, sprouted in 1578. The gift shop features herbs, teas and dried flower creations.

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7. KELSO MUSEUM (former office of Allaire du Pont at Woodstock Farm),
320 WOODSTOCK FARM LANE,
CHESAPEAKE CITY

Dedicated to the memory of one of America’s greatest Thoroughbred Champions, Kelso, Kelso was voted U.S. Horse of the Year for an unmatched five consecutive years, 1960 through 1964 . Along the tree-lined drive, you will pass lush pastures on both sides where this great horse once reigned as king. Kelso’s gravesite is on site as well.

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8. ST. STEPHEN’S CHURCH,
14 GLEBE ROAD, EARLEVILLE

St. Stephen’s Church was organized in 1692 in North Sassafras, one of the thirty original Anglican parishes
in Maryland. The structure was dedicated to the honor of Saint Stephens on March 25, 1706. The fourth structure to house the congregation, the current building reflects the Gothic Revival design common to many 19th century church buildings. The architectural massing is typical of rural churches and consists of an axial orientation, rectangular sanctuary, and dominant front tower with broach spire. The church has undergone renovations and construction in 1737, 1823 and 1873. The new additions included a chancel, steeple, and much steeper roof and has remained virtually unaltered since the 1870’s. The first ordination of African-American clergy south of the Mason-Dixon line occurred here in 1834. There is currently an interim rector at the church.

 

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9. MOUNT HARMON PLANTATION,
600 MT. HARMON ROAD, EARLEVILLE

Mount Harmon is one of the few remaining colonial era Plantations open to the public, and is a historic and scenic treasure. The Plantation is situated on a peninsula formed by creeks and inlets of the Sassafras River in Cecil County, Maryland, known on early maps as World’s End. Mount Harmon features a manor house c. 1730, colonial kitchen, formal boxwood garden, rare tobacco prize house, 200-acre nature preserve, and a scenic waterfront location with nature trails, abundant wildlife and rare flora. Mount Harmon is listed on the National Historic Register, is an official Chesapeake Bay Gateway Network site and is located on the Captain John Smith Water Trail. Mount Harmon is an important colonial era landmark and center for heritage preservation and education.

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